Commentary: Donors, Alumni Helped Take Down an Ivy League President. Is This a Moment or a Movement?

December 17, 2023 1 min read

Douglas Belkin
Wall Street Journal

Excerpt: The recent resignation of University of Pennsylvania President Liz Magill was a rarity in higher education—outside forces had stormed up the ivory tower and dethroned a leader. It was an uprising years in the making.

 Princetonians for Free Speech co-founder Edward Yingling anticipates that over time prospective students will vote with their feet, especially if some employers stop hiring from certain universities because they don’t believe students are exposed to a range of views and are free to engage in open debate…. "The elite schools…will become known as schools of indoctrination and not true universities," said Yingling. "A Harvard degree will no longer be a ticket to success, it will be a scarlet letter."

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